uucp.info-4   [plain text]


This is uucp.info, produced by makeinfo version 4.1 from uucp.texi.

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* UUCP: (uucp).                 Transfer mail and news across phone lines.
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   This file documents Taylor UUCP, version 1.07.

   Copyright (C) 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 2002 Ian Lance Taylor

   Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of this
manual provided the copyright notice and this permission notice are
preserved on all copies.

   Permission is granted to copy and distribute modified versions of
this manual under the conditions for verbatim copying, provided also
that the section entitled "Copying" are included exactly as in the
original, and provided that the entire resulting derived work is
distributed under the terms of a permission notice identical to this
one.

   Permission is granted to copy and distribute translations of this
manual into another language, under the above conditions for modified
versions, except that the section entitled "Copying" may be included in
a translation approved by the author instead of in the original English.


File: uucp.info,  Node: Debugging Levels,  Prev: Log File Names,  Up: config File

Debugging Levels
----------------

`debug STRING ...'
     Set the debugging level.  This command is only effective if the
     code has been compiled to include debugging.  The default is to
     have no debugging.  The arguments are strings which name the types
     of debugging to be turned on.  The following types of debugging
     are defined:

    `abnormal'
          Output debugging messages for abnormal situations, such as
          recoverable errors.

    `chat'
          Output debugging messages for chat scripts.

    `handshake'
          Output debugging messages for the initial handshake.

    `uucp-proto'
          Output debugging messages for the UUCP session protocol.

    `proto'
          Output debugging messages for the individual link protocols.

    `port'
          Output debugging messages for actions on the communication
          port.

    `config'
          Output debugging messages while reading the configuration
          files.

    `spooldir'
          Output debugging messages for actions in the spool directory.

    `execute'
          Output debugging messages whenever another program is
          executed.

    `incoming'
          List all incoming data in the debugging file.

    `outgoing'
          List all outgoing data in the debugging file.

    `all'
          All of the above.

     The debugging level may also be specified as a number.  A 1 will
     set `chat' debugging, a 2 will set both `chat' and `handshake'
     debugging, and so on down the possibilities.  Currently an 11 will
     turn on all possible debugging, since there are 11 types of
     debugging messages listed above; more debugging types may be added
     in the future.  The `debug' command may be used several times in
     the configuration file; every debugging type named will be turned
     on.  When running any of the programs, the `-x' switch (actually,
     for `uulog' it's the `-X' switch) may be used to turn on
     debugging.  The argument to the `-x' switch is one of the strings
     listed above, or a number as described above, or a comma separated
     list of strings (e.g., `-x chat,handshake').  The `-x' switch may
     also appear several times on the command line, in which case all
     named debugging types will be turned on.  The `-x' debugging is in
     addition to any debugging specified by the `debug' command; there
     is no way to cancel debugging information.  The debugging level
     may also be set specifically for calls to or from a specific
     system with the `debug' command in the system file (*note
     Miscellaneous (sys)::).

     The debugging messages are somewhat idiosyncratic; it may be
     necessary to refer to the source code for additional information
     in some cases.


File: uucp.info,  Node: sys File,  Next: port File,  Prev: config File,  Up: Configuration Files

The System Configuration File
=============================

   By default there is a single system configuration, named `sys' in
the directory NEWCONFIGDIR.  This may be overridden by the `sysfile'
command in the main configuration file; see *Note Configuration File
Names::.

   These files describe all remote systems known to the UUCP package.

* Menu:

* Defaults and Alternates::     Using Defaults and Alternates
* Naming the System::           Naming the System
* Calling Out::                 Calling Out
* Accepting a Call::            Accepting a Call
* Protocol Selection::          Protocol Selection
* File Transfer Control::       File Transfer Control
* Miscellaneous (sys)::         Miscellaneous sys File Commands
* Default sys File Values::     Default Values


File: uucp.info,  Node: Defaults and Alternates,  Next: Naming the System,  Prev: sys File,  Up: sys File

Defaults and Alternates
-----------------------

   The first set of commands in the file, up to the first `system'
command, specify defaults to be used for all systems in that file.  Each
`sys' file uses a different set of defaults.

   Subsequently, each set of commands from `system' up to the next
`system' command describe a particular system.  Default values may be
overridden for specific systems.

   Each system may then have a series of alternate choices to use when
calling out or calling in.  The first set of commands for a particular
system, up to the first `alternate' command, provide the first choice.
Subsequently, each set of commands from `alternate' up to the next
`alternate' command describe an alternate choice for calling out or
calling in.

   When a system is called, the commands before the first `alternate'
are used to select a phone number, port, and so forth; if the call fails
for some reason, the commands between the first `alternate' and the
second are used, and so forth.  Well, not quite.  Actually, each
succeeding alternate will only be used if it is different in some
relevant way (different phone number, different chat script, etc.).  If
you want to force the same alternate to be used again (to retry a phone
call more than once, for example), enter the phone number (or any other
relevant field) again to make it appear different.

   The alternates can also be used to give different permissions to an
incoming call based on the login name.  This will only be done if the
first set of commands, before the first `alternate' command, uses the
`called-login' command.  The list of alternates will be searched, and
the first alternate with a matching `called-login' command will be
used.  If no alternates match, the call will be rejected.

   The `alternate' command may also be used in the file-wide defaults
(the set of commands before the first `system' command).  This might be
used to specify a list of ports which are available for all systems
(for an example of this, see *Note Gateway Example::) or to specify
permissions based on the login name used by the remote system when it
calls in.  The first alternate for each system will default to the
first alternate for the file-wide defaults (as modified by the commands
used before the first `alternate' command for this system), the second
alternate for each system to the second alternate for the file-wide
defaults (as modified the same way), and so forth.  If a system
specifies more alternates than the file-wide defaults, the trailing
ones will default to the last file-wide default alternate.  If a system
specifies fewer alternates than the file-wide defaults, the trailing
file-wide default alternates will be used unmodified.  The
`default-alternates' command may be used to modify this behaviour.

   This can all get rather confusing, although it's easier to use than
to describe concisely; the `uuchk' program may be used to ensure that
you are getting what you want.


File: uucp.info,  Node: Naming the System,  Next: Calling Out,  Prev: Defaults and Alternates,  Up: sys File

Naming the System
-----------------

`system STRING'
     Specify the remote system name.  Subsequent commands up to the next
     `system' command refer to this system.

`alternate [STRING]'
     Start an alternate set of commands (*note Defaults and
     Alternates::).  An optional argument may be used to name the
     alternate.  This name will be recorded in the log file if the
     alternate is used to call the system.  There is no way to name the
     first alternate (the commands before the first `alternate'
     command).

`default-alternates BOOLEAN'
     If the argument is false, any remaining default alternates (from
     the defaults specified at the top of the current system file) will
     not be used.  The default is true.

`alias STRING'
     Specify an alias for the current system.  The alias may be used by
     local `uucp' and `uux' commands, as well as by the remote system
     (which can be convenient if a remote system changes its name).
     The default is to have no aliases.

`myname STRING'
     Specifies a different system name to use when calling the remote
     system.  Also, if `called-login' is used and is not `ANY', then,
     when a system logs in with that login name, STRING is used as the
     local system name.  Because the local system name must be
     determined before the remote system has identified itself, using
     `myname' and `called-login' together for any system will set the
     local name for that login; this means that each locally used
     system name must have a unique login name associated with it.
     This allows a system to have different names for an external and
     an internal network.  The default is to not use a special local
     name.


File: uucp.info,  Node: Calling Out,  Next: Accepting a Call,  Prev: Naming the System,  Up: sys File

Calling Out
-----------

   This section describes commands used when placing a call to another
system.

* Menu:

* When to Call::                When to Call
* Placing the Call::            Placing the Call
* Logging In::                  Logging In


File: uucp.info,  Node: When to Call,  Next: Placing the Call,  Prev: Calling Out,  Up: Calling Out

When to Call
............

`time STRING [NUMBER]'
     Specify when the system may be called.  The first argument is a
     time string; see *Note Time Strings::.  The optional second
     argument specifies a retry time in minutes.  If a call made during
     a time that matches the time string fails, no more calls are
     permitted until the retry time has passed.  By default an
     exponentially increasing retry time is used: after each failure
     the next retry period is longer.  A retry time specified in the
     `time' command is always a fixed amount of time.

     The `time' command may appear multiple times in a single alternate,
     in which case if any time string matches the system may be called.
     When the `time' command is used for a particular system, any
     `time' or `timegrade' commands that appeared in the system
     defaults are ignored.

     The default time string is `Never'.

`timegrade CHARACTER STRING [NUMBER]'
     The CHARACTER specifies a grade.  It must be a single letter or
     digit.  The STRING is a time string (*note Time Strings::).  All
     jobs of grade CHARACTER or higher (where `0' > `9' > `A' > `Z' >
     `a' > `z') may be run at the specified time.  An ordinary `time'
     command is equivalent to using `timegrade' with a grade of `z',
     permitting all jobs.  If there are no jobs of a sufficiently high
     grade according to the time string, the system will not be called.
     Giving the `-s' switch to `uucico' to force it to call a system
     causes it to assume there is a job of grade `0' waiting to be run.

     The optional third argument specifies a retry time in minutes.
     See the `time' command, above, for more details.

     Note that the `timegrade' command serves two purposes: 1) if there
     is no job of sufficiently high grade the system will not be
     called, and 2) if the system is called anyway (because the `-s'
     switch was given to `uucico') only jobs of sufficiently high grade
     will be transferred.  However, if the other system calls in, the
     `timegrade' commands are ignored, and jobs of any grade may be
     transferred (but see `call-timegrade' and `called-timegrade',
     below).  Also, the `timegrade' command will not prevent the other
     system from transferring any job it chooses, regardless of who
     placed the call.

     The `timegrade' command may appear multiple times without using
     `alternate'.  When the `timegrade' command is used for a
     particular system, any `time' or `timegrade' commands that
     appeared in the system defaults are ignored.

     If this command does not appear, there are no restrictions on what
     grade of work may be done at what time.

`max-retries NUMBER'
     Gives the maximum number of times this system may be retried.  If
     this many calls to the system fail, it will be called at most once
     a day whatever the retry time is.  The default is 26.

`success-wait NUMBER'
     A retry time, in seconds, which applies after a successful call.
     This can be used to put a limit on how frequently the system is
     called.  For example, an argument of 1800 means that the system
     will not be called more than once every half hour.  The default is
     0, which means that there is no limit.

`call-timegrade CHARACTER STRING'
     The CHARACTER is a single character `A' to `Z', `a' to `z', or `0'
     to `9' and specifies a grade.  The STRING is a time string (*note
     Time Strings::).  If a call is placed to the other system during a
     time which matches the time string, the remote system will be
     requested to only run jobs of grade CHARACTER or higher.
     Unfortunately, there is no way to guarantee that the other system
     will obey the request (this UUCP package will, but there are
     others which will not); moreover, job grades are historically
     somewhat arbitrary, so specifying a grade will only be meaningful
     if the other system cooperates in assigning grades.  This grade
     restriction only applies when the other system is called, not when
     the other system calls in.

     The `call-timegrade' command may appear multiple times without
     using `alternate'.  If this command does not appear, or if none of
     the time strings match, the remote system will be allowed to send
     whatever grades of work it chooses.

`called-timegrade CHARACTER STRING'
     The CHARACTER is a single character `A' to `Z', `a' to `z', or `0'
     to `9' and specifies a grade.  The STRING is a time string (*note
     Time Strings::).  If a call is received from the other system
     during a time which matches the time string, only jobs of grade
     CHARACTER or higher will be sent to the remote system.  This
     allows the job grade to be set for incoming calls, overriding any
     request made by the remote uucico.  As noted above, job grades are
     historically somewhat arbitrary, so specifying a grade will only be
     meaningful if the other system cooperates in assigning grades.
     This grade restriction only applies to jobs on the local system;
     it does not affect the jobs transferred by the remote system.
     This grade restriction only applies when the other system calls
     in, not when the other system is called.

     The `called-timegrade' command may appear multiple times.  If this
     command does not appear, or if none of the time strings match, any
     grade may be sent to the remote system upon receiving a call.


File: uucp.info,  Node: Placing the Call,  Next: Logging In,  Prev: When to Call,  Up: Calling Out

Placing the Call
................

`speed NUMBER'

`baud NUMBER'
     Specify the speed (the term "baud" is technically incorrect, but
     widely understood) at which to call the system.  This will try all
     available ports with that speed until an unlocked port is found.
     The ports are defined in the port file.  If both `speed' and
     `port' commands appear, both are used when selecting a port.  To
     allow calls at more than one speed, the `alternate' command must be
     used (*note Defaults and Alternates::).  If this command does not
     appear, there is no default; the speed may be specified in the port
     file, but if it is not then the natural speed of the port will be
     used (whatever that means on the system).  Specifying an explicit
     speed of 0 will request the natural speed of the port (whatever
     the system sets it to), overriding any default speed from the
     defaults at the top of the file.

`port STRING'
     Name a particular port or type of port to use when calling the
     system.  The information for this port is obtained from the port
     file.  If this command does not appear, there is no default; a
     port must somehow be specified in order to call out (it may be
     specified implicitly using the `speed' command or explicitly using
     the next version of `port').  There may be many ports with the
     same name; each will be tried in turn until an unlocked one is
     found which matches the desired speed.

`port STRING ...'
     If more than one string follows the `port' command, the strings are
     treated as a command that might appear in the port file (*note
     port File::).  If a port is named (by using a single string
     following `port') these commands are ignored; their purpose is to
     permit defining the port completely in the system file rather than
     always requiring entries in two different files.  In order to call
     out, a port must be specified using some version of the `port'
     command, or by using the `speed' command to select ports from the
     port file.

`phone STRING'
`address STRING'
     Give a phone number to call (when using a modem port) or a remote
     host to contact (when using a TCP or TLI port).  The commands
     `phone' and `address' are equivalent; the duplication is intended
     to provide a mnemonic choice depending on the type of port in use.

     When used with a modem port, an `=' character in the phone number
     means to wait for a secondary dial tone (although only some modems
     support this); a `-' character means to pause while dialing for 1
     second (again, only some modems support this).  If the system has
     more than one phone number, each one must appear in a different
     alternate.  The `phone' command must appear in order to call out
     on a modem; there is no default.

     When used with a TCP port, the string names the host to contact.
     It may be a domain name or a numeric Internet address.  If no
     address is specified, the system name is used.

     When used with a TLI port, the string is treated as though it were
     an expect string in a chat script, allowing the use of escape
     characters (*note Chat Scripts::).  The `dialer-sequence' command
     in the port file may override this address (*note port File::).

     When used with a port that not a modem or TCP or TLI, this command
     is ignored.


File: uucp.info,  Node: Logging In,  Prev: Placing the Call,  Up: Calling Out

Logging In
..........

`chat STRINGS'

`chat-timeout NUMBER'

`chat-fail STRING'

`chat-seven-bit BOOLEAN'

`chat-program STRINGS'
     These commands describe a chat script to use when logging on to a
     remote system.  This login chat script is run after any chat
     script defined in the `dial' file (*note dial File::).  Chat
     scripts are explained in *Note Chat Scripts::.

     Two additional escape sequences may be used in send strings.

    `\L'
          Send the login name, as set by the `call-login' command.

    `\P'
          Send the password, as set by the `call-password' command.

     Three additional escape sequences may be used with the
     `chat-program' command.  These are `\L' and `\P', which become the
     login name and password, respectively, and `\Z', which becomes the
     name of the system of being called.

     The default chat script is:

          chat "" \r\c ogin:-BREAK-ogin:-BREAK-ogin: \L word: \P

     This will send a carriage return (the `\c' suppresses the
     additional trailing carriage return that would otherwise be sent)
     and waits for the string `ogin:' (which would be the last part of
     the `login:' prompt supplied by a Unix system).  If it doesn't see
     `ogin:', it sends a break and waits for `ogin:' again.  If it
     still doesn't see `ogin:', it sends another break and waits for
     `ogin:' again.  If it still doesn't see `ogin:', the chat script
     aborts and hangs up the phone.  If it does see `ogin:' at some
     point, it sends the login name (as specified by the `call-login'
     command) followed by a carriage return (since all send strings are
     followed by a carriage return unless `\c' is used) and waits for
     the string `word:' (which would be the last part of the
     `Password:' prompt supplied by a Unix system).  If it sees
     `word:', it sends the password and a carriage return, completing
     the chat script.  The program will then enter the handshake phase
     of the UUCP protocol.

     This chat script will work for most systems, so you will only be
     required to use the `call-login' and `call-password' commands.  In
     fact, in the file-wide defaults you could set defaults of
     `call-login *' and `call-password *'; you would then just have to
     make an entry for each system in the call-out login file.

     Some systems seem to flush input after the `login:' prompt, so they
     may need a version of this chat script with a `\d' before the
     `\L'.  When using UUCP over TCP, some servers will not be handle
     the initial carriage return sent by this chat script; in this case
     you may have to specify the simple chat script `ogin: \L word: \P'.

`call-login STRING'
     Specify the login name to send with `\L' in the chat script.  If
     the string is `*' (e.g., `call-login *') the login name will be
     fetched from the call out login name and password file (*note
     Configuration File Names::).  The string may contain escape
     sequences as though it were an expect string in a chat script
     (*note Chat Scripts::).  There is no default.

`call-password STRING'
     Specify the password to send with `\P' in the chat script.  If the
     string is `*' (e.g., `call-password *') the password will be
     fetched from the call-out login name and password file (*note
     Configuration File Names::).  The string may contain escape
     sequences as though it were an expect string in a chat script
     (*note Chat Scripts::).  There is no default.


File: uucp.info,  Node: Accepting a Call,  Next: Protocol Selection,  Prev: Calling Out,  Up: sys File

Accepting a Call
----------------

`called-login STRINGS'
     The first STRING specifies the login name that the system must use
     when calling in.  If it is `ANY' (e.g., `called-login ANY') any
     login name may be used; this is useful to override a file-wide
     default and to indicate that future alternates may have different
     login names.  Case is significant.  The default value is `ANY'.

     Different alternates (*note Defaults and Alternates::) may use
     different `called-login' commands, in which case the login name
     will be used to select which alternate is in effect; this will
     only work if the first alternate (before the first `alternate'
     command) uses the `called-login' command.

     Additional strings may be specified after the login name; they are
     a list of which systems are permitted to use this login name.  If
     this feature is used, then normally the login name will only be
     given in a single `called-login' command.  Only systems which
     appear on the list, or which use an explicit `called-login'
     command, will be permitted to use that login name.  If the same
     login name is used more than once with a list of systems, all the
     lists are concatenated together.  This feature permits you to
     restrict a login name to a particular set of systems without
     requiring you to use the `called-login' command for every single
     system; you can achieve a similar effect by using a different
     system file for each permitted login name with an appropriate
     `called-login' command in the file-wide defaults.

`callback BOOLEAN'
     If BOOLEAN is true, then when the remote system calls `uucico'
     will hang up the connection and prepare to call it back.  The
     default is false.

`called-chat STRINGS'

`called-chat-timeout NUMBER'

`called-chat-fail STRING'

`called-chat-seven-bit BOOLEAN'

`called-chat-program STRINGS'
     These commands may be used to define a chat script (*note Chat
     Scripts::) that is run whenever the local system is called by the
     system being defined.  The chat script defined by the `chat'
     command (*note Logging In::), on the other hand, is used when the
     remote system is called.  This called chat script might be used to
     set special modem parameters that are appropriate to a particular
     system.  It is run after protocol negotiation is complete, but
     before the protocol has been started.  For additional escape
     sequence which may be used besides those defined for all chat
     scripts, see *Note Logging In::.  There is no default called chat
     script.  If the called chat script fails, the incoming call will
     be aborted.


File: uucp.info,  Node: Protocol Selection,  Next: File Transfer Control,  Prev: Accepting a Call,  Up: sys File

Protocol Selection
------------------

`protocol STRING'
     Specifies which protocols to use for the other system, and in which
     order to use them.  This would not normally be used.  For example,
     `protocol tfg'.

     The default depends on the characteristics of the port and the
     dialer, as specified by the `seven-bit' and `reliable' commands.
     If neither the port nor the dialer use either of these commands,
     the default is to assume an eight-bit reliable connection.  The
     commands `seven-bit true' or `reliable false' might be used in
     either the port or the dialer to change this.  Each protocol has
     particular requirements that must be met before it will be
     considered during negotiation with the remote side.

     The `t' and `e' protocols are intended for use over TCP or some
     other communication path with end to end reliability, as they do no
     checking of the data at all.  They will only be considered on a
     TCP port which is both reliable and eight bit.  For technical
     details, see *Note t Protocol::, and *Note e Protocol::.

     The `i' protocol is a bidirectional protocol.  It requires an
     eight-bit connection.  It will run over a half-duplex link, such as
     Telebit modems in PEP mode, but for efficient use of such a
     connection you must use the `half-duplex' command (*note port
     File::).  *Note i Protocol::.

     The `g' protocol is robust, but requires an eight-bit connection.
     *Note g Protocol::.

     The `G' protocol is the System V Release 4 version of the `g'
     protocol.  *Note Big G Protocol::.

     The `a' protocol is a Zmodem like protocol, contributed by Doug
     Evans.  It requires an eight-bit connection, but unlike the `g' or
     `i' protocol it will work if certain control characters may not be
     transmitted.

     The `j' protocol is a variant of the `i' protocol which can avoid
     certain control characters.  The set of characters it avoids can
     be set by a parameter.  While it technically does not require an
     eight bit connection (it could be configured to avoid all
     characters with the high bit set) it would be very inefficient to
     use it over one.  It is useful over a eight-bit connection that
     will not transmit certain control characters.  *Note j Protocol::.

     The `f' protocol is intended for use with X.25 connections; it
     checksums each file as a whole, so any error causes the entire
     file to be retransmitted.  It requires a reliable connection, but
     only uses seven-bit transmissions.  It is a streaming protocol,
     so, while it can be used on a serial port, the port must be
     completely reliable and flow controlled; many aren't.  *Note f
     Protocol::.

     The `v' protocol is the `g' protocol as used by the DOS program
     UUPC/Extended.  It is provided only so that UUPC/Extended users
     can use it; there is no particular reason to select it.  *Note v
     Protocol::.

     The `y' protocol is an efficient streaming protocol.  It does error
     checking, but when it detects an error it immediately aborts the
     connection.  This requires a reliable, flow controlled, eight-bit
     connection.  In practice, it is only useful on a connection that is
     nearly always error-free.  Unlike the `t' and `e' protocols, the
     connection need not be entirely error-free, so the `y' protocol
     can be used on a serial port.  *Note y Protocol::.

     The protocols will be considered in the order shown above.  This
     means that if neither the `seven-bit' nor the `reliable' command
     are used, the `t' protocol will be used over a TCP connection and
     the `i' protocol will be used over any other type of connection
     (subject, of course, to what is supported by the remote system; it
     may be assumed that all systems support the `g' protocol).

     Note that currently specifying both `seven-bit true' and `reliable
     false' will not match any protocol.  If this occurs through a
     combination of port and dialer specifications, you will have to
     use the `protocol' command for the system or no protocol will be
     selected at all (the only reasonable choice would be `protocol f').

     A protocol list may also be specified for a port (*note port
     File::), but, if there is a list for the system, the list for the
     port is ignored.

`protocol-parameter CHARACTER STRING ...'
     CHARACTER is a single character specifying a protocol.  The
     remaining strings are a command specific to that protocol which
     will be executed if that protocol is used.  A typical command is
     something like `window 7'.  The particular commands are protocol
     specific.

     The `i' protocol supports the following commands, all of which take
     numeric arguments:

    `window'
          The window size to request the remote system to use.  This
          must be between 1 and 16 inclusive.  The default is 16.

    `packet-size'
          The packet size to request the remote system to use.  This
          must be between 1 and 4095 inclusive.  The default is 1024.

    `remote-packet-size'
          If this is between 1 and 4095 inclusive, the packet size
          requested by the remote system is ignored, and this is used
          instead.  The default is 0, which means that the remote
          system's request is honored.

    `sync-timeout'
          The length of time, in seconds, to wait for a SYNC packet
          from the remote system.  SYNC packets are exchanged when the
          protocol is started.  The default is 10.

    `sync-retries'
          The number of times to retry sending a SYNC packet before
          giving up.  The default is 6.

    `timeout'
          The length of time, in seconds, to wait for an incoming
          packet before sending a negative acknowledgement.  The
          default is 10.

    `retries'
          The number of times to retry sending a packet or a negative
          acknowledgement before giving up and closing the connection.
          The default is 6.

    `errors'
          The maximum number of errors to permit before closing the
          connection.  The default is 100.

    `error-decay'
          The rate at which to ignore errors.  Each time this many
          packets are received, the error count is decreased by one, so
          that a long connection with an occasional error will not
          exceed the limit set by `errors'.  The default is 10.

    `ack-frequency'
          The number of packets to receive before sending an
          acknowledgement.  The default is half the requested window
          size, which should provide good performance in most cases.

     The `g', `G' and `v' protocols support the following commands, all
     of which take numeric arguments, except `short-packets' which
     takes a boolean argument:

    `window'
          The window size to request the remote system to use.  This
          must be between 1 and 7 inclusive.  The default is 7.

    `packet-size'
          The packet size to request the remote system to use.  This
          must be a power of 2 between 32 and 4096 inclusive.  The
          default is 64 for the `g' and `G' protocols and 1024 for the
          `v' protocol.  Many older UUCP packages do not support packet
          sizes larger than 64, and many others do not support packet
          sizes larger than 128.  Some UUCP packages will even dump
          core if a larger packet size is requested.  The packet size
          is not a negotiation, and it may be different in each
          direction.  If you request a packet size larger than the
          remote system supports, you will not be able to send any
          files.

    `startup-retries'
          The number of times to retry the initialization sequence.
          The default is 8.

    `init-retries'
          The number of times to retry one phase of the initialization
          sequence (there are three phases).  The default is 4.

    `init-timeout'
          The timeout in seconds for one phase of the initialization
          sequence.  The default is 10.

    `retries'
          The number of times to retry sending either a data packet or
          a request for the next packet.  The default is 6.

    `timeout'
          The timeout in seconds when waiting for either a data packet
          or an acknowledgement.  The default is 10.

    `garbage'
          The number of unrecognized bytes to permit before dropping the
          connection.  This must be larger than the packet size.  The
          default is 10000.

    `errors'
          The number of errors (malformed packets, out of order
          packets, bad checksums, or packets rejected by the remote
          system) to permit before dropping the connection.  The
          default is 100.

    `error-decay'
          The rate at which to ignore errors.  Each time this many
          packets are received, the error count is decreased by one, so
          that a long connection with an occasional error will not
          exceed the limit set by `errors'.  The default is 10.

    `remote-window'
          If this is between 1 and 7 inclusive, the window size
          requested by the remote system is ignored and this is used
          instead.  This can be useful when dealing with some poor UUCP
          packages.  The default is 0, which means that the remote
          system's request is honored.

    `remote-packet-size'
          If this is between 32 and 4096 inclusive the packet size
          requested by the remote system is ignored and this is used
          instead.  There is probably no good reason to use this.  The
          default is 0, which means that the remote system's request is
          honored.

    `short-packets'
          If this is true, then the code will optimize by sending
          shorter packets when there is less data to send.  This
          confuses some UUCP packages, such as System V Release 4 (when
          using the `G' protocol) and Waffle; when connecting to such a
          package, this parameter must be set to false.  The default is
          true for the `g' and `v' protocols and false for the `G'
          protocol.

     The `a' protocol is a Zmodem like protocol contributed by Doug
     Evans.  It supports the following commands, all of which take
     numeric arguments except for `escape-control', which takes a
     boolean argument:

    `timeout'
          Number of seconds to wait for a packet to arrive.  The
          default is 10.

    `retries'
          The number of times to retry sending a packet.  The default
          is 10.

    `startup-retries'
          The number of times to retry sending the initialization
          packet.  The default is 4.

    `garbage'
          The number of garbage characters to accept before closing the
          connection.  The default is 2400.

    `send-window'
          The number of characters that may be sent before waiting for
          an acknowledgement.  The default is 1024.

    `escape-control'
          Whether to escape control characters.  If this is true, the
          protocol may be used over a connection which does not
          transmit certain control characters, such as `XON' or `XOFF'.
          The connection must still transmit eight bit characters
          other than control characters.  The default is false.

     The `j' protocol can be used over an eight bit connection that will
     not transmit certain control characters.  It accepts the same
     protocol parameters that the `i' protocol accepts, as well as one
     more:

    `avoid'
          A list of characters to avoid.  This is a string which is
          interpreted as an escape sequence (*note Chat Scripts::).
          The protocol does not have a way to avoid printable ASCII
          characters (byte values from 32 to 126, inclusive); only
          ASCII control characters and eight-bit characters may be
          avoided.  The default value is `\021\023'; these are the
          characters `XON' and `XOFF', which many connections use for
          flow control.  If the package is configured to use
          `HAVE_BSD_TTY', then on some versions of Unix you may have to
          avoid `\377' as well, due to the way some implementations of
          the BSD terminal driver handle signals.

     The `f' protocol is intended for use with error-correcting modems
     only; it checksums each file as a whole, so any error causes the
     entire file to be retransmitted.  It supports the following
     commands, both of which take numeric arguments:

    `timeout'
          The timeout in seconds before giving up.  The default is 120.

    `retries'
          How many times to retry sending a file.  The default is 2.

     The `t' and `e' protocols are intended for use over TCP or some
     other communication path with end to end reliability, as they do no
     checking of the data at all.  They both support a single command,
     which takes a numeric argument:

    `timeout'
          The timeout in seconds before giving up.  The default is 120.

     The `y' protocol is a streaming protocol contributed by Jorge Cwik.
     It supports the following commands, both of which take numeric
     arguments:

    `timeout'
          The timeout in seconds when waiting for a packet.  The
          default is 60.

    `packet-size'
          The packet size to use.  The default is 1024.

     The protocol parameters are reset to their default values after
     each call.


File: uucp.info,  Node: File Transfer Control,  Next: Miscellaneous (sys),  Prev: Protocol Selection,  Up: sys File

File Transfer Control
---------------------

`send-request BOOLEAN'
     The BOOLEAN determines whether the remote system is permitted to
     request files from the local system.  The default is yes.

`receive-request BOOLEAN'
     The BOOLEAN determines whether the remote system is permitted to
     send files to the local system.  The default is yes.

`request BOOLEAN'
     A shorthand command, equivalent to specifying both `send-request
     BOOLEAN' and `receive-request BOOLEAN'.

`call-transfer BOOLEAN'
     The BOOLEAN is checked when the local system places the call.  It
     determines whether the local system may do file transfers queued
     up for the remote system.  The default is yes.

`called-transfer BOOLEAN'
     The BOOLEAN is checked when the remote system calls in.  It
     determines whether the local system may do file transfers queued
     up for the remote system.  The default is yes.

`transfer BOOLEAN'
     A shorthand command, equivalent to specifying both `call-transfer
     BOOLEAN' and `called-transfer BOOLEAN'.

`call-local-size NUMBER STRING'
     The STRING is a time string (*note Time Strings::).  The NUMBER is
     the size in bytes of the largest file that should be transferred
     at a time matching the time string, if the local system placed the
     call and the request was made by the local system.  This command
     may appear multiple times in a single alternate.  If this command
     does not appear, or if none of the time strings match, there are
     no size restrictions.

     With all the size control commands, the size of a file from the
     remote system (as opposed to a file from the local system) will
     only be checked if the other system is running this package: other
     UUCP packages will not understand a maximum size request, nor will
     they provide the size of remote files.

`call-remote-size NUMBER STRING'
     Specify the size in bytes of the largest file that should be
     transferred at a given time by remote request, when the local
     system placed the call.  This command may appear multiple times in
     a single alternate.  If this command does not appear, there are no
     size restrictions.

`called-local-size NUMBER STRING'
     Specify the size in bytes of the largest file that should be
     transferred at a given time by local request, when the remote
     system placed the call.  This command may appear multiple times in
     a single alternate. If this command does not appear, there are no
     size restrictions.

`called-remote-size NUMBER STRING'
     Specify the size in bytes of the largest file that should be
     transferred at a given time by remote request, when the remote
     system placed the call.  This command may appear multiple times in
     a single alternate. If this command does not appear, there are no
     size restrictions.

`local-send STRINGS'
     Specifies that files in the directories named by the STRINGS may
     be sent to the remote system when requested locally (using `uucp'
     or `uux').  The directories in the list should be separated by
     whitespace.  A `~' may be used for the public directory.  On a
     Unix system, this is typically `/usr/spool/uucppublic'; the public
     directory may be set with the `pubdir' command.  Here is an
     example of `local-send':

          local-send ~ /usr/spool/ftp/pub

     Listing a directory allows all files within the directory and all
     subdirectories to be sent.  Directories may be excluded by
     preceding them with an exclamation point.  For example:

          local-send /usr/ftp !/usr/ftp/private ~

     means that all files in `/usr/ftp' or the public directory may be
     sent, except those files in `/usr/ftp/private'.  The list of
     directories is read from left to right, and the last directory to
     apply takes effect; this means that directories should be listed
     from top down.  The default is the root directory (i.e., any file
     at all may be sent by local request).

`remote-send STRINGS'
     Specifies that files in the named directories may be sent to the
     remote system when requested by the remote system.  The default is
     `~'.

`local-receive STRINGS'
     Specifies that files may be received into the named directories
     when requested by a local user.  The default is `~'.

`remote-receive STRINGS'
     Specifies that files may be received into the named directories
     when requested by the remote system.  The default is `~'.  On
     Unix, the remote system may only request that files be received
     into directories that are writeable by the world, regardless of
     how this is set.

`forward-to STRINGS'
     Specifies a list of systems to which files may be forwarded.  The
     remote system may forward files through the local system on to any
     of the systems in this list.  The string `ANY' may be used to
     permit forwarding to any system.  The default is to not permit
     forwarding to other systems.  Note that if the remote system is
     permitted to execute the `uucp' command, it effectively has the
     ability to forward to any system.

`forward-from STRINGS'
     Specifies a list of systems from which files may be forwarded.  The
     remote system may request files via the local system from any of
     the systems in this list.  The string `ANY' may be used to permit
     forwarding to any system.  The default is to not permit forwarding
     from other systems.  Note that if a remote system is permitted to
     execute the `uucp' command, it effectively has the ability to
     request files from any system.

`forward STRINGS'
     Equivalent to specifying both `forward-to STRINGS' and
     `forward-from STRINGS'.  This would normally be used rather than
     either of the more specific commands.

`max-file-time NUMBER'
     The maximum amount of time which will be sent sending any one file
     if there are other files to send.  This will only be effective
     when using a protocol which permits interrupting one file send to
     send another file.  This is true of the `i' and `j' protocols.
     The default is to have no maximum.


File: uucp.info,  Node: Miscellaneous (sys),  Next: Default sys File Values,  Prev: File Transfer Control,  Up: sys File

Miscellaneous sys File Commands
-------------------------------

`sequence BOOLEAN'
     If BOOLEAN is true, then conversation sequencing is automatically
     used for the remote system, so that if somebody manages to spoof
     as the remote system, it will be detected the next time the remote
     system actually calls.  This is false by default.

`command-path STRINGS'
     Specifies the path (a list of whitespace separated directories) to
     be searched to locate commands to execute.  This is only used for
     commands requested by `uux', not for chat programs.  The default
     is from `policy.h'.

`commands STRINGS'
     The list of commands which the remote system is permitted to
     execute locally.  For example: `commands rnews rmail'.  If the
     value is `ALL' (case significant), all commands may be executed.
     The default is `rnews rmail'.

`free-space NUMBER'
     Specify the minimum amount of file system space (in bytes) to
     leave free after receiving a file.  If the incoming file will not
     fit, it will be rejected.  This initial rejection will only work
     when talking to another instance of this package, since older UUCP
     packages do not provide the file size of incoming files.  Also,
     while a file is being received, `uucico' will periodically check
     the amount of free space.  If it drops below the amount given by
     the `free-space' command, the file transfer will be aborted.  The
     default amount of space to leave free is from `policy.h'.  This
     file space checking may not work on all systems.

`pubdir STRING'
     Specifies the public directory that is used when `~' is specifed in
     a file transfer or a list of directories.  This essentially
     overrides the public directory specified in the main configuration
     file for this system only.  The default is the public directory
     specified in the main configuration file (which defaults to a
     value from `policy.h').

`debug STRING ...'
     Set additional debugging for calls to or from the system.  This
     may be used to debug a connection with a specific system.  It is
     particularly useful when debugging incoming calls, since debugging
     information will be generated whenever the call comes in.  See the
     `debug' command in the main configuration file (*note Debugging
     Levels::) for more details.  The debugging information specified
     here is in addition to that specified in the main configuration
     file or on the command line.

`max-remote-debug STRING ...'
     When the system calls in, it may request that the debugging level
     be set to a certain value.  The `max-remote-debug' command may be
     used to put a limit on the debugging level which the system may
     request, to avoid filling up the disk with debugging information.
     Only the debugging types named in the `max-remote-debug' command
     may be turned on by the remote system.  To prohibit any debugging,
     use `max-remote-debug none'.


File: uucp.info,  Node: Default sys File Values,  Prev: Miscellaneous (sys),  Up: sys File

Default sys File Values
-----------------------

   The following are used as default values for all systems; they can be
considered as appearing before the start of the file.

     time Never
     chat "" \r\c ogin:-BREAK-ogin:-BREAK-ogin: \L word: \P
     chat-timeout 10
     callback n
     sequence n
     request y
     transfer y
     local-send /
     remote-send ~
     local-receive ~
     remove-receive ~
     command-path [ from `policy.h' ]
     commands rnews rmail
     max-remote-debug abnormal,chat,handshake