snmpd.conf   [plain text]


###############################################################################
#
# EXAMPLE.conf:
#   An example configuration file for configuring the ucd-snmp snmpd agent.
#
###############################################################################
#
# This file is intended to only be an example.  If, however, you want
# to use it, it should be placed in /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf.
# When the snmpd agent starts up, this is where it will look for it.
#
# You might be interested in generating your own snmpd.conf file using
# the "snmpconf" program (perl script) instead.  It's a nice menu
# based interface to writing well commented configuration files.  Try it!
#
# Note: This file is automatically generated from EXAMPLE.conf.def.
# Do NOT read the EXAMPLE.conf.def file! Instead, after you have run
# configure & make, and then make sure you read the EXAMPLE.conf file
# instead, as it will tailor itself to your configuration.

# All lines beginning with a '#' are comments and are intended for you
# to read.  All other lines are configuration commands for the agent.

#
# PLEASE: read the snmpd.conf(5) manual page as well!
#


###############################################################################
# Access Control
###############################################################################

# YOU SHOULD CHANGE THE "COMMUNITY" TOKEN BELOW TO A NEW KEYWORD ONLY
# KNOWN AT YOUR SITE.  YOU *MUST* CHANGE THE NETWORK TOKEN BELOW TO
# SOMETHING REFLECTING YOUR LOCAL NETWORK ADDRESS SPACE.

# By far, the most common question I get about the agent is "why won't
# it work?", when really it should be "how do I configure the agent to
# allow me to access it?"
#
# By default, the agent responds to the "public" community for read
# only access, if run out of the box without any configuration file in 
# place.  The following examples show you other ways of configuring
# the agent so that you can change the community names, and give
# yourself write access as well.
#
# The following lines change the access permissions of the agent so
# that the COMMUNITY string provides read-only access to your entire
# NETWORK (EG: 10.10.10.0/24), and read/write access to only the
# localhost (127.0.0.1, not its real ipaddress).
#
# For more information, read the FAQ as well as the snmpd.conf(5)
# manual page.

####
# First, map the community name (COMMUNITY) into a security name
# (local and mynetwork, depending on where the request is coming
# from):

#       sec.name  source          community
com2sec local     localhost       COMMUNITY
com2sec mynetwork NETWORK/24      COMMUNITY

####
# Second, map the security names into group names:

#             	sec.model  sec.name
group MyRWGroup	v1         local
group MyRWGroup	v2c        local
group MyRWGroup	usm        local
group MyROGroup v1         mynetwork
group MyROGroup v2c        mynetwork
group MyROGroup usm        mynetwork

####
# Third, create a view for us to let the groups have rights to:

#           incl/excl subtree                          mask
view all    included  .1                               80

####
# Finally, grant the 2 groups access to the 1 view with different
# write permissions:

#                context sec.model sec.level match  read   write  notif
access MyROGroup ""      any       noauth    exact  all    none   none
access MyRWGroup ""      any       noauth    exact  all    all    none

# rwuser: a SNMPv3 read-write user
#   arguments:  user [noauth|auth|priv] [restriction_oid]

rwuser  admin  

# rocommunity: a SNMPv1/SNMPv2c read-only access community name
#   arguments:  community [default|hostname|network/bits] [oid]

rocommunity  public  

# rwcommunity: a SNMPv1/SNMPv2c read-write access community name
#   arguments:  community [default|hostname|network/bits] [oid]

#rwcommunity  private  

# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------


###############################################################################
# System contact information
#

# It is also possible to set the sysContact and sysLocation system
# variables through the snmpd.conf file.  **PLEASE NOTE** that setting
# the value of these objects here makes these objects READ-ONLY
# (regardless of any access control settings).  Any attempt to set the
# value of an object whose value is given here will fail with an error
# status of notWritable.

syslocation Right here, right now.
syscontact Administrator <postmaster@example.com>
sysservices 76

# Example output of snmpwalk:
#   % snmpwalk -v 1 -c public localhost system
#   system.sysDescr.0 = "SunOS name sun4c"
#   system.sysObjectID.0 = OID: enterprises.ucdavis.ucdSnmpAgent.sunos4
#   system.sysUpTime.0 = Timeticks: (595637548) 68 days, 22:32:55
#   system.sysContact.0 = "Me <me@somewhere.org>"
#   system.sysName.0 = "name"
#   system.sysLocation.0 = "Right here, right now."
#   system.sysServices.0 = 72


# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------


###############################################################################
# Process checks.
#
#  The following are examples of how to use the agent to check for
#  processes running on the host.  The syntax looks something like:
#
#  proc NAME [MAX=0] [MIN=0]
#
#  NAME:  the name of the process to check for.  It must match
#         exactly (ie, http will not find httpd processes).
#  MAX:   the maximum number allowed to be running.  Defaults to 0.
#  MIN:   the minimum number to be running.  Defaults to 0.

#
#  Examples:
#

#  Make sure httpd is running
proc httpd

#  Make sure mountd is running
#proc mountd

#  Make sure there are no more than 4 ntalkds running, but 0 is ok too.
#proc ntalkd 4

#  Make sure at least one sendmail, but less than or equal to 10 are running.
#proc sendmail 10 1

#  A snmpwalk of the prTable would look something like this:
# 
# % snmpwalk -v 1 -c public localhost .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.2
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prIndex.1 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prIndex.2 = 2
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prIndex.3 = 3
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prNames.1 = "mountd"
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prNames.2 = "ntalkd"
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prNames.3 = "sendmail"
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMin.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMin.2 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMin.3 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMax.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMax.2 = 4
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMax.3 = 10
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prCount.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prCount.2 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prCount.3 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrorFlag.1 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrorFlag.2 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrorFlag.3 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrMessage.1 = "No mountd process running."
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrMessage.2 = ""
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrMessage.3 = ""
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrFix.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrFix.2 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrFix.3 = 0
#
#  Note that the errorFlag for mountd is set to 1 because one is not
#  running (in this case an rpc.mountd is, but thats not good enough),
#  and the ErrMessage tells you what's wrong.  The configuration
#  imposed in the snmpd.conf file is also shown.  
# 
#  Special Case:  When the min and max numbers are both 0, it assumes
#  you want a max of infinity and a min of 1.
#


# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------


###############################################################################
# Executables/scripts
#

#
#  You can also have programs run by the agent that return a single
#  line of output and an exit code.  Here are two examples.
#
#  exec NAME PROGRAM [ARGS ...]
#
#  NAME:     A generic name.
#  PROGRAM:  The program to run.  Include the path!
#  ARGS:     optional arguments to be passed to the program

# a simple hello world
exec echotest /bin/echo hello world

# Run a shell script containing:
#
# #!/bin/sh
# echo hello world
# echo hi there
# exit 35
#
# Note:  this has been specifically commented out to prevent
# accidental security holes due to someone else on your system writing
# a /tmp/shtest before you do.  Uncomment to use it.
#
#exec shelltest /bin/sh /tmp/shtest

# Then, 
# % snmpwalk -v 1 -c public localhost .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.8
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extIndex.1 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extIndex.2 = 2
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extNames.1 = "echotest"
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extNames.2 = "shelltest"
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extCommand.1 = "/bin/echo hello world"
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extCommand.2 = "/bin/sh /tmp/shtest"
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extResult.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extResult.2 = 35
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extOutput.1 = "hello world."
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extOutput.2 = "hello world."
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extErrFix.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extErrFix.2 = 0

# Note that the second line of the /tmp/shtest shell script is cut
# off.  Also note that the exit status of 35 was returned.

# Print full status for web server and web objects via Mac OS X Server
# administration tool.
exec web_status /usr/sbin/serveradmin status web
exec wo_status /usr/sbin/serveradmin status webobjects

# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------


###############################################################################
# disk checks
#

# The agent can check the amount of available disk space, and make
# sure it is above a set limit.  

# disk PATH [MIN=DEFDISKMINIMUMSPACE]
#
# PATH:  mount path to the disk in question.
# MIN:   Disks with space below this value will have the Mib's errorFlag set.
#        Default value = DEFDISKMINIMUMSPACE.

# Check the / partition and make sure it contains at least 10 megs.

disk / 10000

# % snmpwalk -v 1 -c public localhost .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.9
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskIndex.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskPath.1 = "/" Hex: 2F 
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskDevice.1 = "/dev/dsk/c201d6s0"
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskMinimum.1 = 10000
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskTotal.1 = 837130
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskAvail.1 = 316325
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskUsed.1 = 437092
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskPercent.1 = 58
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskErrorFlag.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskErrorMsg.1 = ""

# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------


###############################################################################
# load average checks
#

# load [1MAX=DEFMAXLOADAVE] [5MAX=DEFMAXLOADAVE] [15MAX=DEFMAXLOADAVE]
#
# 1MAX:   If the 1 minute load average is above this limit at query
#         time, the errorFlag will be set.
# 5MAX:   Similar, but for 5 min average.
# 15MAX:  Similar, but for 15 min average.

# Check for loads:
#load 12 14 14

# % snmpwalk -v 1 -c public localhost .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.10
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveIndex.1 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveIndex.2 = 2
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveIndex.3 = 3
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveNames.1 = "Load-1"
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveNames.2 = "Load-5"
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveNames.3 = "Load-15"
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveLoad.1 = "0.49" Hex: 30 2E 34 39 
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveLoad.2 = "0.31" Hex: 30 2E 33 31 
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveLoad.3 = "0.26" Hex: 30 2E 32 36 
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveConfig.1 = "12.00"
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveConfig.2 = "14.00"
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveConfig.3 = "14.00"
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrorFlag.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrorFlag.2 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrorFlag.3 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrMessage.1 = ""
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrMessage.2 = ""
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrMessage.3 = ""

# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------


###############################################################################
# Extensible sections.
# 

# This alleviates the multiple line output problem found in the
# previous executable mib by placing each mib in its own mib table:

# Run a shell script containing:
#
# #!/bin/sh
# echo hello world
# echo hi there
# exit 35
#
# Note:  this has been specifically commented out to prevent
# accidental security holes due to someone else on your system writing
# a /tmp/shtest before you do.  Uncomment to use it.
#
# exec .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.50 shelltest /bin/sh /tmp/shtest

# % snmpwalk -v 1 -c public localhost .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.50
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.1.1 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.2.1 = "shelltest"
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.3.1 = "/bin/sh /tmp/shtest"
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.100.1 = 35
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.101.1 = "hello world."
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.101.2 = "hi there."
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.102.1 = 0

# Now the Output has grown to two lines, and we can see the 'hi
# there.' output as the second line from our shell script.
#
# Note that you must alter the mib.txt file to be correct if you want
# the .50.* outputs above to change to reasonable text descriptions.

# Other ideas:
# 
# exec .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.51 ps /bin/ps 
# exec .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.52 top /usr/local/bin/top
# exec .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.53 mailq /usr/bin/mailq

# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------


###############################################################################
# Pass through control.
# 

# Usage:
#   pass MIBOID EXEC-COMMAND
#
# This will pass total control of the mib underneath the MIBOID
# portion of the mib to the EXEC-COMMAND.  
#
# Note:  You'll have to change the path of the passtest script to your
# source directory or install it in the given location.
# 
# Example:  (see the script for details)
#           (commented out here since it requires that you place the
#           script in the right location. (its not installed by default))

# pass .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.255 /bin/sh PREFIX/local/passtest

# % snmpwalk -v 1 -c public localhost .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.255
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.1 = "life the universe and everything"
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.2.1 = 42
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.2.2 = OID: 42.42.42
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.3 = Timeticks: (363136200) 42 days, 0:42:42
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.4 = IpAddress: 127.0.0.1
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.5 = 42
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.6 = Gauge: 42
#
# % snmpget -v 1 -c public localhost .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.255.5
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.5 = 42
#
# % snmpset -v 1 -c public localhost .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.255.1 s "New string"
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.1 = "New string"
#

# For specific usage information, see the man/snmpd.conf.5 manual page
# as well as the local/passtest script used in the above example.

###############################################################################
# Subagent control
#

# The agent can support subagents using a number of extension mechanisms.
# From the 4.2.1 release, AgentX support is being compiled in by default.
# To use this mechanism, simply uncomment the following directive.
#
#  master  agentx
#
#   Please see the file README.agentx for more details.
#


###############################################################################
# Further Information
#
#  See the snmpd.conf manual page, and the output of "snmpd -H".
#  MUCH more can be done with the snmpd.conf than is shown as an
#  example here.